Town of Gardiner NY
   

COMMUNITY
ORGANIZATIONS
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History of the Town


Contact: Carleton Mabee
Town Historian
Phone: (845) 255-1968
Hours: call for information
Additional Links:
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Historical Map Local Cemetaries 1925 Mystery Fire
Other Places Named Gardiner the Gardiner Family Name Additional Historical Links
           

 
Historical Societies Community Telephone
Gardiner Historical Society Gardiner (845) 255-9675
Gardiner-Shawangunk Historical Society Wallkill (845) 895-3986
The Huguenot Historical Society New Paltz (845) 255-1660
Ulster County Historical Society Marbletown (845) 338-5614

The Hudson Valley History Project: Gardiner Launched in 2006, the goal of the Hudson Valley History Project: Gardiner is to preserve the personal histories of Gardiner's longest standing residents. Each of these Story Subjects has lived in Gardiner for at least 50 years. The project's coordinators have enlisted the services of local writers to document and edit these special stories. Click here to read the stories.

Welcome
The town of Gardiner is a minor civil division located in southern Ulster County.  Based on the 2000 federal Census, the population of the town of Gardiner is approximately 5,238 persons with approximately 45 square miles of land and water surface area. The average density is about 116 persons per square mile.

The town is situated on the outer fringe of the New York metropolitan area. It is approximately equidistant from the Hudson River cities of Kingston, Newburgh and Poughkeepsie and approximately 75 miles north of New York City. The landscape varies from vertical rock cliffs and evergreen forests of the Shawangunk Mountains to the basins and broad floodplains of the Wallkill River, Shawangunk Kill and Mara Kill streams.


Gardiner Fire A Mystery

The future looked promising for this little village. No one that day would have dreamed that Friday's newspapers would carry a headline Gardiner Village Devastated By Fire. It was Thursday, May 21, 1925. Gardiner would never be the same.

Read the entire story.

These black-and-white photographs are taken from the archives of the Library of Congress, Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS). The original photographs were likely taken by photographers employed by the WPA during the Great Depression.

The house shown on the Home page is the Matthew J. LeFevre house, also known as the John A. LeFevre house (ca. 1772), located on the northwesterly side of NY Route 208 near the Kettleborough Schoolhouse (ca. 1835). The photo likely dates from 1933-1936.

The house shown above is simply labelled the Deyo-Bevier House, Ireland Corners, presumably the same stone house still located on the westerly side of NY Route 208 approx. 600 feet north of the intersection with US Route 44-55.

The Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) operates under congressional authority from the Historic Sites Act of 1935 to document historic structures and make available to the public an archive of records of America's architectural heritage. For over sixty years HABS, the oldest federal preservation program, has played a leading role in preservation through documentation.

In 1933 the National Park Service, Department of the Interior established HABS as a make-work program for architects, draftsmen and photographers left jobless by the Great Depression. Its mission then, as today, was to create a lasting archive of America's historic architecture. In so doing, HABS provided a data base of primary source material for the then fledgling historic preservation movement.

In 1934 the National Park Service entered into an agreement with the Library of Congress and the American Institute of Architects (AIA) as cosponsors of the HABS program. Under this tripartite agreement the National Park Service administers the operations of HABS with funds appropriated by Congress and supplemented by donations from individuals, foundations, historical organizations, and other local, state and federal agencies.

For more information about HABS, click here

Ulster County Poorhouse
The Ulster County Poorhouse (ca 1827-1954) was located along Libertyville Road on the Wallkill River~near the Town of Gardiner-Town of New Paltz boundary line. The land is now occupied by the Ulster County Fair and Ulster County Pool Complex. To read more about a recent comprehensive historical examination of Ulster County's Underprivileged click here

The town historian is a volunteer position appointed each year by the Town Board at the annual meeting.
The current town historian is Carleton Mabee. There is also a newly-formed Gardiner Historical Society which meets monthly.The Ulster County Poorhouse (ca 1827-1954) was located along Libertyville Road on the Wallkill River~near the Town of Gardiner-Town of New Paltz boundary line. The land is now occupied by the Ulster County Fair and Ulster County Pool Complex. To read more about a recent comprehensive historical examination of Ulster County's Underprivileged click here

The town historian is a volunteer position appointed each year by the Town Board at the annual meeting.
The current town historian is Carleton Mabee.
There is also a newly-formed Gardiner Historical Society which meets monthly.The Ulster County Poorhouse (ca 1827-1954) was located along Libertyville Road on the Wallkill River~near the Town of Gardiner-Town of New Paltz boundary line. The land is now occupied by the Ulster County Fair and Ulster County Pool Complex. To read more about a recent comprehensive historical examination of Ulster County's Underprivileged click here

 


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